Billboard

 USA

 
Many people know Billboard magazine is the Bible of the Music Industry, the place to go for such essential "charts" as the Hot 100 Singles, the Billboard 200 Album Chart, and the Power Playlist from more than 30 top radio stations. But few consumers are probably aware that Billboard is more than 100 years old. [1894 – present] (cBub)

1967 July 29

Vol. 79 No. 30

Merson's 'Invention' Radio Spot Clicking
p 3


Short article on page 3 and photo on page 16, related to Hagstrom guitars ad campaign. More on this campaign read at hagstromguitars.com.


Merson's 'Invention' Radio Spot Clicking (page 3)

NEW YORK—A radio promotion campaign by Merson Musical Products Corporation has met with thumping success, according to company officials.

The effort, in cooperation with stations WOR-FM, New York; WFIL, Philadelphia and WRKO, Boston, featured a one-minute commercial using the music of Verve Records' Mothers of Invention with a message from the group`s leader, Frank Zappa. The message invited listeners to write the station for a full-size poster of the combo and information about the Hagstrom guitar
line, which is used by the Mothers.

Post cards informed the listener that he could pick up his free poster at his nearest Hagstrom dealer, whose name and address were printed on the card.

To date, there have been some 15,000 responses, and dealers throughout the promotion program area say that many of these have become customers.

Merson vice-president Bernard Mersky said this program is the first in a series of Merson consumer-oriented promotion programs. The program was launched a few months ago and will run at least a few more months, Mersky said.

Photo on page 16

FRANK ZAPPA, leader of Verve's Mothers of Invention, is seen with Bernard Mersky, vice-president, Merson Musical Products, with whom the artist has just signed a promotion and advertising contract. Merson distributes the Unicord line of amps, guitars, combo organs and other pop musical merchandise.

 

 

1968 February 24

Vol. 80 No. 8

 


On page 59 is a full page "Lonely Little Girl" single ad, maybe Zappa's only full-page ad in Billboard?

 

 

 

This is Frank Zappa's speech in the First International Music Industry Conference, held in April 20-23, 1969, Paradise Isle Hotel, Paradise Island, Nassau, Bahamas.

  

Source: The Waldo Scrapbooks 

 
 

1969 July 12

Vol. 81 No. 28

The New Trends in Music
p 40 


Frank Zappa feels that a link exists between music and art today. He spoke of the trend in modern art known as concept art, and added that some people in pop music today relate to this concept. As an illustration he played an electronic composition using sounds outside the frequency of human hearing. He also used selections from the Columbia album, "The World of Harry Partch." Partch writes music of 32 tones to the octave. Zappa also played various other examples of electronic music, including a record utilizing sound made by a gong and a balloon. Still another was a recording of electronically modified sounds of German children playing. (read more)

  

Source: americanradiohistory.com 

 
 

1971 September 4

 


Page 2: Zappa Suing 2 Magazines

LOS ANGELES - Frank Zappa is suing Playboy and Esquire for $4 million, changing an unauthorized likeness of the Mothers of Invention leader appeared in a psychedelic-type illustration collage for a Dexter Funky Shoes ad which ran in both magazines November, 1970.

The suit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court stated that the misleading implication Zappa was endorsing the shoes had irreparably damaged his reputation and right for privacy.

Page 53: Fillmore East - June 1971 ad.

Source: slime.oofytv.set 

 

1971 November 20

Zappa's Zany Zooms Perk Stormy 'Trip'
By Ned Freedland, p 8
 


Frank Zappa has finally made the movie he's been trying to get off the ground for years. "200 Motels" features the spectacularly far-out electronic visual effects possible with Technicolor's videotape-to-film Vidtronics process ... colors flowing into each other as a scene progresses and sudden dissolves of the characters into geometric forms. (read more)

  

Source: americanradiohistory.com

 

1974 September 7

Frank Zappa: Santa Monica Civic Auditorium
By David Rensin, p 20


Frank Zappa's concerts are far from being predictable, and his Aug. 16 set lived up to that standard admirably. Faced with an overly agitated audience that rudely accorded show opener Tom Waits — a fine, up-and-coming artist — nary an ear, Zappa extolled the crowd's "sophistication," and made them wait 15 minutes while the band tuned. Then he stated pointedly: "We're not going to try to impress you. After all this is L.A. We'll start with 'Cosmik Debris' and work our way down."

If Zappa taught a sly lesson in manners, he did equally well with the show itself. "Cosmik Debris" marked the beginning of an evening's excellent entertainment. Zappa and the current Mothers Of Invention: George Duke, keyboards and vocals; Ruth Underwood, percussion and vibes; Napoleon Murphy Brock, sax and vocals; Tom Fowler, bass, and Chester Thompson, drums, twisted and turned through seemingly impossible passages, displaying a quality of musicianship rarely shown nowadays.

Zappa hammed it up for the audience with tongue-in-cheek commentary and the tunes, including "Pygmy Twilight," "Stink-Foot," "Idiot Bastard Son" and "Montana," lacked none of the vitality often discarded by the wayside in deference to technical perfection. Zappa tries to bring both attributes to the audience's attention, though judging from the relatively young age of those attending one might wonder at the impact.

Nonetheless, the fans clamored for more when Zappa introduced furniture entrepreneur Ed Barbara and bade him "sell the Mothers" to the crowd.

The reaction was even more strenuous for the encores: "Uncle Meat" and the classic "Trouble Comin' Every Day," from the Mothers' debut album "Freak Out."

  

Source: americanradiohistory.com

 

1977 March 5

 

Discreet Zaps Suit Over Zappa Tapes
By John Sippel, p 23


  

Source: Charles Ulrich

 

1977 November 5

 

Zappa Zaps WB, Discreet Over Album
By John Sippel, p 16


Source: Charles Ulrich

 

Source: www.americanradiohistory.com

 

1990 May 19

No. 36

 

Frank Zappa's Crusade – 25 Years And Counting
By Drew Wheeler, pp 3, 10, 13

Cucamonga Science And Beyond
By Drew Wheeler, pp 4, 14

Just Plain Folks
By Drew Wheeler, p 6

Zappa: Leading The Way In Digital & CD Technologies
By Jim Bessman, p 12

We Are What We Watch
By Drew Wheeler, p 14


This 16-page addition to the May 19, 1990 issue of Billboard magazine is a celebration of the 25th anniversary of Frank Zappa's career in rock.

 

1993 October 9

Vol. 105 No. 41

 

PolyGram, Zappa In Legal Clash Over Song Rights
By Melinda Newmna, pp 20, 22


PolyGram Diversified Entertainment has filed suit against Frank Zappa, alleging that the artist has failed to act in good faith with the company over the audio, home video, and broadcast exploitation of a Zappa tribute concert, "Zappa's Universe." (read more)

Source: americanradiohistory.com

 

1993 December 18

Vol. 105 No. 51

 

Zappa, A Man Who Knew No Boundaries
By Drew Wheeler, pp 8, 131


Source: slime.oofytv.set

 

1995 April 8

Vol. 107 No. 14

 


Ads on pages 91, 93, no other Zappa content.

  

Source: americanradiohistory.com

 

2018 May 19

Vol. 130 No. 13

Holograms Hit The Road
 By Cortney Harding, p 20